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20120928
20121006
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the "national law journal" walks us through a term that will tackle affirmative action, and may decide disputes over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: a pennsylvania judge blocked a new law that would have required voters to show photo i.d. at the polls next month. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, ray suarez examines how the debate over voting rights and election year fraud is playing out around the country. >> ifill: then, we have two takes on the battle for north carolina. jeffrey brown reports on the tightening presidential contest. >> brown: barack obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close wi
in the health care law changes that one bit. >> brown: now the case that they did argue today. it's about using u.s. courts to bring international human rights law into effect against multinational corporations. >> right. brown: trying to spit it out. mulley national corporations is what i'm trying to say. >> it involves a 1789 law, the alien tort statute. very simple, straight-forward law that says federal courts have jurisdiction over actions brought by aliens who have been basically injuredded by violations of international law or violations of treaties of the united states. this is oal business. the court heard arguments last term on whether corporations could be held liable under that statute. then it later ordered reargument on a broader question. that is whether these cases can be brought in u.s. courts against any defendant who committed a violation in a foreign country. and today the court heard arguments on that. it's hard to tell. it seemed a number of justices were not happy with business' approach which is to say there is no extra territorial application of this law, period. and ye
abortion providers. >> you find that, along with the culture of death, go all kinds of other law breaking-- not following good sanitary procedure, giving abortions to women who are not actually pregnant, cheating on taxes, all these kinds of things. >> ifill: mccaskill's campaign ads remind voters of akin's comments. >> on march 16, akin said he wants to abolish the minimum wage. on april 21, said he would eliminate student loans. and on august 19, todd akin said only some rapes are "legitimate." what will he say next? >> ifill: but mccaskill has her own problems. romney is well ahead in missouri, and more than half of the voters here disapprove of president obama. she says she remains independent. >> i think the president, if he were in missouri, he would say to missourians what i hope they know about me, and that is i can be a real pain. i am not someone who does what he wants me to do at his beck and call. i have said no to him. it doesn't mean i don't support him; it just means i have a strong objective record of independence. >> ifill: akin is happy to remind voters she voted for bot
spending, the country ached when they also announced 43 new laws they say will fix the economy, the people shrugged. no one really believes that will work, because spaniards aren't working-- that's the problem-- unemployment is rampant now over 25%. whilst the property crash that started the crisis is still festering. further austerity measures will simply suck more money out of the economy and threaten an even deeper recession. spain is trying to save a total of 40 billion from its budget which will hurt. it won't be as excruciately painful as a new round of cuts in greece. they are trying to save an extra 12 billion from a budget that has already been pared to the bone. no one is spared the pain greece not even the most vulnerable. disabled protestors took to the streets today pleading for their benefits not to be cut further. they can no longer even afford the medicine they need they say. >> sreenivasan: the greek government today came to basic agreement on $15 billion worth of cuts in spending over the next two years. the country needs to make the cuts if it wants to keep receiving bai
by the letter of the law on these maintenance reportes, things that could be fixed later are being asked to be fixed now, at least that's what american is saying. these delays really did start to spike after american used bankrupty court to throw out the collective bargaining agreement. >> ifill: what is the status of america's bankruptcy? >> they're reorganizing. they think the hand the pilots are playing, they don't need to get a whole lot of people on the creditor's committee, in the bankruptcy process, saying management has had its shot. the people on the creditor's committee obviously have a very vested interest in how this goes forward. if they think american's current management can't do it, and this is where us airways comes into the picture, it may not take much more of this to go on before other people on the creditor's committee start to switch and the vote comes in favor we're bringing in us airways and merge which is what the pilots and all the unions at americans want right now. >> ifill: if you're a frequent flyer on american, should you be worried at all about underlying
the first thing you have to do is let all of the 2001-2003 tax laws sunset. go away. that's a tax increase, most of which the president wouldn't support. then you have to cut by $5 trillion. so compared to where we are now it's a much smaller reduction in tax revenue which makes it easier to fill the revenue hole and we have five studies, one from martin feldstein, one from the tax foundation, one from the american enterprise institute, we have studies that show there are plans that meet the governor's goal, cut rates 20% across the board, don't lose revenue and make sure the rich pay their fair share of taxes so it can be done. >> brown: but as to filling the hole that we're talking about" those studies -- >> they fill the hole. >> brown: but it depends on where you're at in terms of your income. >> so i think the key is there are tax plans that can fill that hole. jared can write a tax plan that fills that hole and raises taxes and those are the one it is democrats are referring to. >> brown: go ahead. >> first of all, some of what doug just said confused me even more about this because
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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